Business

  • Finance: Share buybacks have been helping keep the bull market afloat — these 8 companies have contributed the most

    Finance: Share buybacks have been helping keep the bull market afloat — these 8 companies have contributed the most



    Over the decade, S&P 500 companies bought back $4.4 trillion shares, including the record-breaking buybacks from Apple that totaled $226.6 billion.

    Over the past decade, S&P 500 companies bought back $4.4 trillion shares, including the record-breaking buybacks from Apple that totaled $226.6 billion.

    • Companies who were flush with cash started to buy back shares after the S&P 500 started to recover from the global financial crisis.
    • Buybacks cut a company's total share count, and spread the profits over fewer shares, boosting their per-share earnings.
    • Over the past decade, S&P 500 companies bought back $4.4 trillion shares, including the record-breaking buybacks from Apple that totaled $226.6 billion.
    • Share buybacks are expected to continue growing for the coming months, according to an analyst from S&P Dow Jones Indices.

    For the 9-1/2-year equity bull run, share buybacks have been a solid backbone of the stock market's continued growth. Buybacks cut a company's total share count, and spread the profits over fewer shares, boosting their per-share earnings and satisfying Wall Street.

    After the S&P 500 started to recover from its financial crisis low in March 2009, companies that were flush with cash started to buy back shares. According to S&P Dow Jones Indices, S&P 500 companies have bought back $4.4 trillion shares over the past decade, including the record-breaking buybacks from Apple that totaled $226.6 billion. No company has bought back more shares than Apple, which announced in March 2012 it would use a large chunk of cash to make the purchases.

    The amount in share repurchases executed by S&P 500 companies hit a record of $190.6 billion in the second quarter, a 58.7 % year-over-year increase, and that number is expected to keep growing for the coming months, according to S&P Dow Jones Indices.

    “Given the record earnings, strong cash-flow, investor demand and corporate statements, the indications are that the high level will continue for the rest of the year,” said Howard Silverblatt, senior index analyst at S&P Dow Jones Indices.

    Here are the top eight companies that contributed $689.4 billion, or 16% of the total S&P global 500 companies buybacks, mostly from the information technology and financial sectors.

    8. Home Depot

    Ticker: HD

    Sector: Consumer Discretionary

    Market cap: $243.5 billion

    10-year buybacks: $50.7 billion

    Source: S&P Dow Jones Indices

    7. Intel

    Ticker: INTC

    Sector: Information Technology

    Market cap: $216.9 billion

    10-year buybacks: $55 billion

    Source: S&P Dow Jones Indices

    6. Wells Fargo

    Ticker: WFC

    Sector: Financials

    Market cap: $272.1 billion

    10-year buybacks: $56.4 billion

    Source: S&P Dow Jones Indices

    5. JPMorgan

    Ticker: JPM

    Sector: Financials

    Market cap: $399.2 billion

    10-year buybacks: $62.8 billion

    Source: S&P Dow Jones Indices

    4. Oracle

    Ticker: ORCL

    Sector: Information Technology

    Market cap: $190 billion

    10-year buybacks: $67.1 billion

    Source: S&P Dow Jones Indices

    3. Cisco Systems

    Ticker: CSCO

    Sector: Information Technology

    Market cap: $227.5 billion

    10-year buybacks: $67.9 billion

    Source: S&P Dow Jones Indices

    2. Microsoft

    Ticker: MSFT

    Sector: Information Technology

    Market cap: $878.6 billion

    10-year buybacks: $102.8 billion

    Source: S&P Dow Jones Indices

    1. Apple

    Ticker: AAPL

    Sector: Information Technology

    Market cap: $1.1 trillion

    10-year buybacks: $226.6 billion

    Source: S&P Dow Jones Indices

    Click here to read the full text by Ethel Jiang

  • 5 important things happening in South Africa today

    5 important things happening in South Africa today



    No ‘Ramaphoria’ following the president’s plan to reignite the economy; SA banks warned of the catastrophic consequences if Gupta accounts were kept open; election polling shows the EFF growing – at the expense of the ANC; and leaked memo shows the Mbeki Foundation is not happy with the ANC land reform angle.

    Click here to read the full text by Staff Writer

  • Finance: The Silicon Valley hometown of Mark Zuckerberg and Tim Cook is relying on millionaires to keep the economy booming — and it signals a huge problem

    Finance: The Silicon Valley hometown of Mark Zuckerberg and Tim Cook is relying on millionaires to keep the economy booming — and it signals a huge problem



    Palo Alto is home to a staggering number of tech billionaires and millionaires.

    Palo Alto, California, is the proverbial capital of Silicon Valley. Its 94301 zip code is home to tech billionaires Mark Zuckerberg, Tim Cook, Larry Page and many millionaire and billionaire executives — and they're stewards of California's booming economy.

    • Palo Alto, California, is the proverbial capital of Silicon Valley.
    • Its 94301 zip code is home to tech billionaires Mark Zuckerberg, Tim Cook, Larry Page and many millionaire and billionaire executives.
    • Palo Alto's affluence runs deep — residents of its two zip codes paid a total of more than $1.5 billion in personal income tax to the state of California in 2016.
    • A recent story by the Los Angeles Times cites experts who are wary of California's reliance on wealthy taxpayers: "If the millionaires get a cold, we all die of the flu."

    In Palo Alto, California, a 67,000-person town in the San Francisco Bay Area, affluence runs deep.

    The median household income in Palo Alto is $137,000, more than double the United States median. And yet, many residents consider themselves middle class as they stretch their incomes to afford high-priced homes and necessities like childcare, according to The Palo Alto Weekly, the community's newspaper.

    Their sense of inadequacy may be attributable to living in the shadows of America's super rich. Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, Apple's Tim Cook, and Google's Larry Page all call Palo Alto home. These billionaires, and many more millionaires, are the real stewards of the town's booming economy.

    According to a recent story by the Los Angeles Times, California's economic success is increasingly contingent upon the wealth of residents of tony enclaves like Palo Alto.

    "We are very dependent on millionaires," Mike Genest, former budget director for Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, told the LA Times. "If the millionaires get a cold, we all die of the flu." Because 70% of California's revenue is derived from personal income tax — a nearly sixfold increase since the early 1950s — a hit to Facebook's or Google's or Tesla's stock could be a hit to many.

    In 2016, 9,000 tax returns from Palo Alto residents in the 94301 zip code — which includes the Stanford University campus — resulted in $934 million in tax revenue for California, more than any other zip code in the state, according to the LA Times. And Palo Alto's 94303 zip code generated an additional $636 million in tax revenue for the state.

    Those tax dollars fund government programs in less affluent areas of California, and eventually "determine whether promises to build more houses, overhaul healthcare or invest in schools can actually be kept," writes the LA Times' Melanie Mason.


    Palo Alto's main drag is dotted with obvious signs of a booming economy. "Teslas, so ubiquitous they've been nicknamed the 'Palo Alto Prius,' roll by in regular intervals. Cooler-shaped robots on wheels and their human handlers maneuver around pedestrians to deliver food and other goods," writes Mason. But it still feels like a small town and that's why big-time CEOs love it, a city manager told the LA Times.

    It's not just a business boom — real estate is surging too. The typical home is valued at more than $3.2 million as of September 2018, according to Zillow. A 1-acre dirt lot was listed for $15 million earlier this year; an 897-square-foot bungalow is for sale for $2.59 million; and a billionaire tech company founder listed his expansive Palo Alto mansion for $100 million in June.

    But the innovation and investment can't last forever, some analysts say. This current economic boom is approaching a decade, writes Mason, and some experts think that's pushing the limit. And when the prosperity of the 1% declines, the state's will too.

    "Analysts at S&P Global noted in August that the state's reliance on high-income earners and capital gains from Palo Alto and its ilk has increased its 'susceptibility to fiscal volatility,'" Mason writes, adding that some budget experts suggest there's a way to reduce reliance on the wealthy — but that's ultimately a job for California's incoming governor.

    But the super rich don't seem to mind. Since 2010, Palo Alto residents "have voted overwhelmingly to impose higher taxes on themselves" on two separate measures, according to the LA Times.

    "In many ways people take [the current prosperity] for granted," the city manager told the LA Times. "There's a kind of faith that we can transform ourselves as needed."

    Click here to read the full text by Tanza Loudenback

  • 6 of the most expensive cars you can buy in South Africa right now

    6 of the most expensive cars you can buy in South Africa right now



    While new vehicle sales in August showed a decline of 2.5% year-on-year, many locals still splash out on some of the finest vehicles money can buy.

    Click here to read the full text by Staff Writer

  • Finance: Turkey's currency surges more than 3% on hopes a detained American pastor will be released

    Finance: Turkey's currency surges more than 3% on hopes a detained American pastor will be released



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    Turkey's currency rallied Monday amid reports Turkey could release an American whose controversial imprisonment has been at the center of an ongoing feud between Ankara and Washington.

    • The Turkish lira was up more than 3% Monday.
    • Turkey may release an American whose imprisonment has caused conflict with the US.
    • Watch the lira trade in real time here.

    Turkey's currency rallied Monday amid reports the country could release an American whose controversial imprisonment has been at the center of an ongoing feud between Ankara and Washington.

    The lira was up more than 3.5% to 6.1279 against the dollar after the Wall Street Journal reported a Turkish court could release 50-year-old Andrew Brunson at an October hearing — if the US turns down pressure to do so. The evangelical pastor was arrested in 2016 for allegedly aiding terrorist groups, charges he denies.

    The case has fueled both diplomatic and economic rifts between the US and Turkey. In August, the Trump administration doubled existing tariff rates on Turkish aluminum and steel after the NATO allies failed to make progress on negotiations for Brunson's release.

    Earlier that month, it had imposed sanctions on Turkey's minister of justice and minister of interior, whom the White House said played "leading roles" in the arrest and detention of Brunson.

    Conflicts between Turkey's central bank and government have also put pressure on the lira, one of the worst-performing currencies this year.

    Turkey's central bank raised its key rate by 625 basis points to 24% in early September, despite backlash from President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. The president backs unorthodox policies like cutting rates amid accelerating inflation and has increasingly tried to wield influence over monetary policy since his reelection this year.

    "October will be a key month on the geopolitical front, and potentially positive headlines could trigger larger swings in USDTRY and TRY assets in general," Citi analysts led by Dirk Willer wrote in a note.

    Click here to read the full text by Gina Heeb

  • Rooftop lease revenues top one billion rand

    Rooftop lease revenues top one billion rand



    Property owners may be losing out on a share of a multi-billion-rand industry in South Africa, says Mark Swemmer-head of the rooftop management business at JSE listed group Jasco.

    Click here to read the full text by Staff Writer

  • Finance: The Nigerian Stock Exchange has suspended trading of Skye Bank Plc shares

    Finance: The Nigerian Stock Exchange has suspended trading of Skye Bank Plc shares



    The Nigerian Stock Exchange has suspended trading of Skye Bank Plc shares

    The NSE stated that the suspension from trading on the floor of The Exchange effective Monday, 24 September 2018.

    The Nigerian Stock Exchange (NSE) has suspended the trading of Skye Bank Plc shares following the withdrawal of its licence by the Central Bank of Nigeria.

    The NSE stated that the suspension from trading on the floor of The Exchange effective Monday, 24 September 2018.

    "The Nigerian Stock Exchange (“The Exchange” OR “NSE”) hereby notifies the investing public that the shares of Skye Bank Plc (“Skye Bank”) will be suspended from trading on the floor of The Exchange effective Monday, 24 September 2018.

    “This action is taken following on the recent regulatory action of the Central Bank of Nigeria revoking the banking license of Skye Bank and in the exercise of the powers of The Exchange pursuant to the Rules on Suspension of Trading in Listed Securities, Rulebook of The Exchange (Issuers’ Rules).

    “Further developments will be communicated as appropriate in due course,” the NSE said.

     

    Last Friday, Nigeria's central bank revoked the operating licence of ailing Skye Bank Plc.

    The decision, CBN said the result of examinations and forensic audit of the bank revealed that the Skye Bank requires urgent recapitalisation as it can no longer continue to live on borrowed times with indefinite liquidity support.

    The apex bank, however, established a bridge bank ‘Polaris Bank,’ to assume the assets and liabilities of Skye Bank Plc, pending final buyout.

    Also from Business Insider Sub-Sahara Africa:

    • Soft drinks giant, Coca-Cola, plans to buy-off Nigeria's Chi juice in 2019

    • These are the 5 most indebted states in Nigeria right now

    • Nigeria's central bank says it is engaging with MTN and 4 banks over $8.1 billion claims

    • Nigeria suspends plans for a national carrier and we all saw it coming

    • CBN says banks will pay N10,000 fine for any delay in instant transfer beyond 4 minutes

    • Nigeria's finance minister, Zainab Ahmed steps in

    • 5 economic problems in the HSBC report that the Nigerian government is yet to address

    • All you need to know as Nigeria’s central bank and MTN forex saga

    • Passion Incubator cofounder talks to Business Insider about the Africa Business Festival

    • I visited the 6 Google Stations in Lagos and here's what I found out about the free Wi-Fi

    Click here to read the full text by Aderemi Ojekunle

  • Concerns raised over mass migration to Johannesburg – here’s how many South Africans are moving

    Concerns raised over mass migration to Johannesburg – here’s how many South Africans are moving



    The NCOP haslaunched a programme looking at the effects of migration on service delivery in Gauteng.

    Click here to read the full text by Staff Writer

  • Finance: What $10 was worth the year you were born, and what you could buy with it today

    Finance: What $10 was worth the year you were born, and what you could buy with it today



    Here's what $10 in the year you were born could buy you in 2018.

    The Bureau of Labor Statistics can calculate how much the American dollar was valued any given year and month. Using the inflation calculator, Business Insider looked at the value of $10 between the years 1965 and 2010 to find out what it could buy in 2018.

    • The value of a dollar changes from year to year as markets and economies fluctuate.
    • The Bureau of Labor Statistics tracks inflation, calculating how much the American dollar was valued in any given year and month.
    • Business Insider looked at the value of $10 between the years 1965 and 2010 to find out what it could buy in 2018.

    The rate of inflation fluctuates year to year, month to month, as markets and economies change.

    The Bureau of Labor Statistics can calculate how much the American dollar was valued any given year and month. Business Insider used the CPI inflation calculator to find the value of a $10 bill every year in January, from 1965 and 2010, in 2018 dollars.

    We then found out how much different products — from Sharpies to New Balance shoes — cost in 2018 to compare the buying power of past years.

    Below, find out what a $10 bill the year you were born could buy you in 2018.

    1965

    Value of a $10 bill in 1965: $80.82

    What you can buy in 2018: A pair of New Balance shoes

    A pair of 574 New Balance women's shoes retail for $79.99. In 1965 dollars, $10 could afford you one fresh pair of New Balances.

    1966

    Value of a $10 bill in 1966: $79.29

    What you can buy in 2018: A Rihanna Fenty makeup palette

    Rihanna released her Fenty makeup line a year ago. A Galaxy Eyes palette from the collection goes for $79. In 1966 dollars, $10 would buy a Fenty fan one shimmery palette.

    1967

    Value of a $10 bill in 1967: $76.64

    What you can buy in 2018: A leather-bound copy of The Bible

    The Holy Bible is the most stolen item worldwide. In 2018, a copy of the Bible with imitation leather bindings costs upwards of $76.56. In 1967 dollars, $10 would have covered a new Holy Bible with little change left over.

    1968

    Value of a $10 bill in 1968: $73.94

    What you can buy in 2018: A one-way train ticket

    Planning a few days in advance, a train ticket from New York City to Boston costs $69 on Wanderu. In 1986 dollars, $10 would afford a one-way train ticket between the two cities.

    1969

    Value of a $10 bill in 1969: $70.83

    What you can buy in 2018: Printer ink

    $10 in 1969 dollars would afford you a high yield variety pack of printing ink for $69.99 at Staples.

    1970

    Value of a $10 bill in 1970: $66.71

    What you can buy in 2018: A Kylie Cosmetics palette

    For $65, you can get Kylie Jenner's Birthday Palette from her Kyshadow collection at Kylie Cosmetics. In 1970 dollars, $10 would cover it.

    1971

    Value of a $10 bill in 1971: $63.35

    What you can buy in 2018: A one-way plane ticket

    A plane ticket from New York City to Miami one month in advance costs $63 on Spirit airlines, not including the added fees, on KAYAK. In 1971 dollars, a passenger could afford a one-way seat to Miami for $10.

    1972

    Value of a $10 bill in 1972: $61.35

    What you can buy in 2018: One Xbox game

    Gaming is a large industry with Call of Duty among the leaders in the pack. Call of Duty: WWII on Xbox One retails for $59.99 at Target. In 1972 dollars, $10 would buy the game with some change for sales tax.

    1973

    Value of a $10 bill in 1973: $59.19

    What you can buy in 2018: A handgun

    In 2018, the Second Amendment is striking national controversy, yet megastores like Walmart sell handguns with ammunition for $56.85. In 1973 dollars, a person could own a gun for just $10.

    1974

    Value of a $10 bill in 1974: $54.11

    What you can buy in 2018: An Amazon Echo

    Consumer: Alexa, what can I buy today that cost $10 in 1974?

    Alexa: Me, on Amazon.

    An Amazon Echo Dot with smart speaker Alexa retails for $49.99. A customer could afford an Echo Dot for $10 in 1974 dollars.

    1975

    Value of a $10 bill in 1975: $48.40

    What you can buy in 2018: 216 diapers

    Baby care in the United States is costly. A pack of 216 Pampers Swaddlers diapers retails for $46.99 at Walmart. In 1975 dollars, $10 would cover a pack of diapers today and allow for some pocket change to go back and grab a few singles at 22 cents a diaper.

    1976

    Value of a $10 bill in 1976: $45.35

    What you can buy in 2018: A skateboard

    Skateboards have been around since the early 1940s but gained popularity in the 1970s. A Zero board sells for $44.95 at Zumiez. In 1976 dollars, $10 would buy a skateboard and maybe a wheel or two.

    1977

    Value of a $10 bill in 1977: $43.10

    What you can buy in 2018: A Yankees jersey

    A blank replica of a New York Yankees jersey sells for $40 on Dexter Shop. In 1977 dollars, $10 would buy one blank pinstripe jersey.

    1978

    Value of a $10 bill in 1978: $40.34

    What you can buy in 2018: A bag of dog food

    A bag of IAMS dry adult dog food retails for $38.94 at Walmart in 2018. In 1978 dollars, $10 affords a pet parent a bag of dog food and some change for a treat.

    1979

    Value of a $10 bill in 1979: $36.92

    What you can buy in 2018: 8 razors

    Razors don't come cheap. A pack of eight refill Gillette Fusion ProGlide Power razor blades cost $34.99 at Walgreens. In 1979 dollars, $10 would cover the cost of a refill pack with some change left over.

    1980

    Value of a $10 bill in 1980: $32.41

    What you can buy in 2018: Apple headphones

    Tech giant Apple was in its infancy by 1980. Today, a pair of Apple earphones retails for $29 on Apple. In 1980 dollars, $10 would buy a pair of Apple headphones with some change left over.

    1981

    Value of a $10 bill in 1981: $28.98

    What you can buy in 2018: 36 batteries

    Today, a pack of 36 AA batteries cost $26.99 at Staples. In 1981 dollars, $10 would cover one pack and you'd have some pocket change left over.

    1982

    Value of a $10 bill in 1982: $26.74

    What you can buy in 2018: 24 toothbrushes

    A pack of Oral-B adult toothbrushes cost $25.99 at Smile Makers. In 1982 dollars, $10 covers the cost of a single pack of toothbrushes after inflation.

    1983

    Value of a $10 bill in 1983: $25.78

    What you can buy in 2018: A "Make America Great Again" hat

    If you want a Donald Trump "Make America Great Again" hat that was made in America, you're going to pay more than from Chinese manufacturers. An American made hat goes for $24.99 on Etsy. In 1983 dollars, $10 would buy you the red hat with some change left over.

    1984

    Value of a $10 bill in 1984: $24.74

    What you can buy in 2018: 2 bottles of wine

    A bottle of Kendall Jackson Reserve Chardonnay runs $11.99 on Wine.com. In 1984 dollars, $10 would buy you two bottles of "America's No. 1 selling Chardonnay."

    1985

    Value of a $10 bill in 1985: $23.90

    What you can buy in 2018: A 12-pack of Coke

    Coca-Cola was around 100 years before 1985. In 2018, a case of 12 cans retails for $4.68 on Amazon. In 1985 dollars, you could buy five cases for $10 with change left over.

    1986

    Value of a $10 bill in 1986: $23.01

    What you can buy in 2018: 3 giant Hershey's bars

    If a regular size Hershey Bar is too small for you, fear not. A 3-pack of 7-oz. Hershey Bars retail for $22.73 on Jet.com. In 1986 dollars, $10 would have kept your sweet tooth under control with some change to spare.

    1987

    Value of a $10 bill in 1987: $22.67

    What you can buy in 2018: An alarm clock

    Most people require some sort of alarm to wake up in the morning. An LED alarm clock with the weather and a dimmer retails for $20.77 on Amazon. In 1987 dollars, you could see the weather and snooze at the same time for $10, with some pocket change left over.

    1988

    Value of a $10 bill in 1988: $21.79

    What you can buy in 2018: 2 movie tickets

    The average cost of one movie ticket in the US is $9.38, according to The Hollywood Reporter. In 1988 dollars, $10 would cover the cost of two tickets.

    1989

    Value of a $10 bill in 1989: $20.82

    What you can buy in 2018: 30 rolls of toilet paper

    If you're shopping for toilet paper, you have your pick in 2018. The cost of 30 rolls of Scott 1000 toilet paper costs $19.98 at your local Walmart. In 1989 dollars, $10 would give you some wiggle room for taxes, but doesn't upgrade you to additional ply toilet paper.

    1990

    Value of a $10 bill in 1990: $19.79

    What you can buy in 2018: A 12-pack of Red Bull

    In 2018, a case of 12 Red Bull Energy Drink sells for $19.69 on Amazon. In 1990 dollars, $10 would buy a 12-pack.

    1991

    Value of a $10 bill in 1991: $18.73

    What you can buy in 2018: Tide Pods

    Doing laundry is a costly life chore. In 2018, 72-count pack of Tide detergent pods retails for $17.97 on Amazon. In 1991 dollars, a consumer could purchase Tide pods for $10 and have some change left over.

    1992

    Value of a $10 bill in 1992: $18.26

    What you can buy in 2018: 2 bottles of nail polish

    The first Essie nail polish formula was released in 1980, and has remained one of the most popular polish brands since. A fresh bottle of a newly released Essie color retails for $9. In 1992 dollars, $10 would buy you two bottles with a little change left over.

    1993

    Value of a $10 bill in 1993: $17.68

    What you can buy in 2018: A 24-pack of water

    Water is a human necessity and when it's bottled and labeled, the price increases. In 2018, a case of 24 Poland Springs water bottles costs $17.23 on Amazon. In 1993 dollars, $10 would cover 24 bottles.

    1994

    Value of a $10 bill in 1994: $17.25

    What you can buy in 2018: A pregnancy test

    Pregnancy tests were available in the mid 90s and developed its efficiency in recent years. A Walgreens brand digital pregnancy test costs $16.99. In 1994 dollars, $10 could afford one pregnancy test.

    1995

    Value of a $10 bill in 1995: $16.78

    What you can buy in 2018: 200 Advil tablets

    A 200-count bottle of Advil costs $16.66 on Amazon. In 1995 dollars, $10 could afford one bottle of the painkiller, with a bit of change left.

    1996

    Value of a $10 bill in 1996: $16.33

    What you can buy in 2018: 4 bottles of Kombucha

    Health Ade Kombucha is big in 2018 and one bottle retails for $3.99 on Target. In 1996 dollars, $10 would afford you four of the pomegranate-flavored health drinks.

    1997

    Value of a $10 bill in 1997: $15.85

    What you can buy in 2018: A 10-pack of condoms

    In 2018, a pack of 10 latex Trojan BareSkin condoms costs $15.49 at Walgreens. In 1997 dollars, $10 would buy one pack.

    1998

    Value of a $10 bill in 1998: $15.60

    What you can buy in 2018: 5 hand sanitizers

    A single Purell dispenser costs $3 at Office Depot. In 1998 dollars, $10 buys a consumer five hand sanitizers.

    1999

    Value of a $10 bill in 1999: $15.35

    What you can buy in 2018: 18 pairs of men's socks

    Socks will never go out of fashion. Men's ankle socks retail for $14 at Walmart. In 1999 dollars, $10 would cover an 18-pack of socks, plus sales tax.

    2000

    Value of a $10 bill in 2000: $14.94

    What you can buy in 2018: 3 pints of ice cream

    A pint of Ben and Jerry's classic Phish Food ice cream costs $4.79 on Jet.com. In 2000 dollars, $10 would buy three tubs of ice cream.

    2001

    Value of a $10 bill in 2001: $14.40

    What you can buy in 2018: 12 Post-it pads

    A colorful collection of Post-it notes costs $13.99 at Staples. In 2001 dollars, $10 would buy a pack of 12 pads of various colors with change to cover sales tax.

    2002

    Value of a $10 bill in 2002: $14.24

    What you can buy in 2018: A Netflix subscription

    The cost of a premium Netflix subscription, offering streaming on four separate screens, cost $13.99 a month in 2018. In 2002 dollars, $10 would cover the cost of a monthly premium subscription with some change left over.

    2003

    Value of a $10 bill in 2003: $13.88

    What you can buy in 2018: A 3-ring binder

    Back-to-school shopping is costly. A heavy-duty three ring binder at Staples costs $12.99. In 2003 dollars, $10 would buy a student one binder with some change leftover for paper.

    2004

    Value of a $10 bill in 2004: $13.61

    What you can buy in 2018: 4.5 gallons of gas

    The cost of gas fluctuates often. The average cost per-gallon currently is $3, according to CNBC. Using 2004 dollars would cover 4.5 gallons of gas.

    2005

    Value of a $10 bill in 2005: $13.22

    What you can buy in 2018: A 100-pack of hair ties

    Most women would say hair ties are a necessary buy. In 2018, a package of 100-count Scunci elastic hair ties costs $6.46 at Walmart. In 2005 dollars, $10 would afford a consumer two packs.

    2006

    Value of a $10 bill in 2006: $12.72

    What you can buy in 2018: 1 share of GE stock

    As of September 18, you can own one share of General Electric stock for $12.66. In 2006 dollars, you could have bought that share with a $10 bill.

    2007

    Value of a $10 bill in 2007: $12.46

    What you can buy in 2018: 5 boxes of spaghetti

    In 2018, a 32-oz. box of Barilla spaghetti costs $2.42 on Amazon. A customer could purchase five boxes of spaghetti for $10 in 2007 dollars.

    2008

    Value of a $10 bill in 2008: $11.95

    What you can buy in 2018: 48 ounces of ground coffee

    In 2018, a 48-oz. jar of Folgers Classic Roast ground coffee retails for $11.68 at Walmart. In 2008 dollars, a coffee consumer could buy one jar and have some change left for sales tax.

    2009

    Value of a $10 bill in 2009: $11.94

    What you can buy in 2018: A 12-pack of Sharpies

    Today, a box of 12 Sharpies retail for $11.79 according to Staples. In 2009 dollars, $10 would cushion a buyer for sales tax.

    2010

    Value of a $10 bill in 2010: $11.64

    What you can buy in 2018: 2 PSLs

    In 2018, Pumpkin Spice Latte at Starbucks cost around $5. In 2010 dollars, $10 would afford you two PSL treats with room to make it a Grande.

    Click here to read the full text by Myelle Lansat

  • How much it costs to ‘bullet-proof’ your car in South Africa

    How much it costs to ‘bullet-proof’ your car in South Africa



    A growing number of motorists are looking to armour their vehicles as hijackings are becoming more violent in South Africa.

    Click here to read the full text by Staff Writer

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